2018_Team27

Project Overview  |  Proof of Concept  |  Final Design  |  Fabrication  |  Testing and Results  |  Meet the Team  |  Acknowledgements


Project Overview

People in isolation should have access to the highest quality emergency medical devices. Current splints are cumbersome, do not simultaneously apply pressure, and hinder heating and/or cooling the injury. Minute Care’s device will easily and safely accomplish all these goals while also providing splint support for the injury.

The industry that team’s product belongs to is a subsection of the medical industry, particularly the immobilization products. More specifically the area of personal portable medical equipment. The primary competition is 3M and SAM Medical. Team Minute Care has prepared to enter this market by performing a SWOT analysis on both competitors and an initial patent search that includes patents from the competitors. 3M has a large brand recognition in the medical community. They supply a large amount of operating room and paramedic equipment while also having the largest R&D budget. SAM Medical is a small-scale manufacturer that produces niche medical products and self-rescue equipment. While SAM Medical operates on a much smaller scale than 3M, the products they produce are in direct competition to our own making them just as significant of a threat. SAM Medical has a strong relationship with the military and 3M has affordable products worldwide.  People will recognize 3M’s name an automatically assume quality.  SAM Medical has a history of providing lifesaving products for the military and First Responders.  These professionals are confident that these products are their go-to.  But STIMS sets itself apart from these products by an integration system of care.

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Proof of Concept

For the proof of concept, Team Minute Care decided to use the functions that best matches the results from the marketing survey that was taken.  Surveyors wanted a product that was affordable, that is light weight, and that is easy to apply when they are exploring.  Minute Care determine a product that is cost effective, and easy to manufacture.  The product falls under five pounds of weight.  The device will integrate an easy to tension system; the tension can be applied using one hand without much effort.  The engineering analysis that was completed determined that this is possible, taking into account the awkward angle that a victim may be in.  Quick clips is a function Team Minute Care determined would be the easiest and quickest to apply the splint and remove for the victim.  The decision matrix assisted the team to determine these function for a final design concept.  There was not one best design, the team learn.  But the ability to combine functions on one final design was determine to be plausible with the decision matrix and engineering analysis.

The final concept is to include a fiberglass material that hardens when water is applied to it.  This will provide the rigidity and support for the injured limb.  Next, the tensioning system will include a knob that has a torque limit integrated inside.  This will prevent the user from over tensioning the system and injuring the limb any farther.  A sterilization pad sit under the fiberglass mesh to keep the injured area clean if the injury is a punctured wound.

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Final design

The Self Tensioning Immobilizing Splint System (STIMS) is designed to be a self-contained, compact solution to in the field medical treatment for wounded limbs. As the name suggests, this is a splint type product. The unit is divided into four separate layers. There is a sterile inner absorbent liner made to protect a skin wound. This layer is wrapped in a thin waterproof shell. There is then a water activated hardening fiberglass layer to give the splint system rigidity and further protect the wounded limb. The outer layer is made of ballistic nylon to distribute the load of the tensioning system evenly across the user’s limb. This tensioning force is provided by a cable ratcheting unit mounted to the outer layer.

The product design specification (PDS) for the final design is a lightweight product that is adaptable to various arm conical sizes. The intent is for a customer to apply without the assistance of another person. The product is sterile for any lacerated injuries, and will sit in a vacuum seal bag to keep its integrity. Pressures has been calculated to remain under the tourniquet limit, while still securing the arm properly. A Boa® ratcheting, quick tensioning system, will be integrated for simplicity and quick application. The Boa® system is designed to prevent from over tensioning on its own casing.

The project provided some insights to the team regarding specific design characteristics. Material selection is vital to follow the PDS and follow what market research told us. Each material was carefully chosen and is calculated for each specification is was meant for. Other characteristics of the project was finding a material that will hold up to the PDS pressure. Simply sewing on a thin metal cable is not something  that should be manufacture without understanding the risk analysis of what this final product will endure. Another characteristic

STIMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact solution to do in the field medical treatment for wounded limbs. As the name suggests, this is a splint type product. The unit is divided into four separate layers. There is a sterile inner absorbent liner made to protect a skin wound. This layer is wrapped in a thin waterproof shell. There is then a water activated hardening fiberglass layer to give the splint system rigidity and further protect the wounded limb. The outer layer is made of ballistic nylon to distribute the load of the tensioning system evenly across the user’s limb. This tensioning force is provided by a cable ratcheting unit mounted to the outer layer.

The product was designed with ease of use in mind. The system is meant to be applied by a single user in an injured state. A user would simply lay the wounded limb on top of the open splint, secure the tensioning clasps, and twist the ratcheting wheel until the proper amount of pressure has been applied to the limb. If they choose, they can then pour water over the splint to activate the hardening material.

The STIMS product provides the outdoor adventurer a means of quick medical treatment to a wounded limb without the need of a medical professional. Traditional splint systems and even competing design require the user to have the aid of at least another person in the immediate vicinity to assist in applying the splint. The STIMS unit provides the user a lightweight, simple option when looking preventative safety equipment for outdoor extreme sports.

Team Minute Care hopes to make a durable product that is storable in any day bag, as well as provide the immediate care a customer requires. Although a temporary fix, any limb injury and provide comfort and the protection until a victim or customer can see a professional to seek care.

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Fabrication

Description of Materials:

STIMS is based off of RICE, and is a hybrid of splints and casts. Because of this, there is much layering in STIMS. There are about four layers in STIMS. The base layer is an absorbent gauze, that is used to absorb any fluids that may be on the user’s skin, including blood, water, etc.. The next layer is a nylon barrier, to prevent any liquid exchange between layers. The third layer is fiberglass, which hardens in 10 minutes with the addition of liquid and within 15 minutes when exposed to air. Over the fiberglass, the final layer is a barrier that allows water to go through to the fiberglass but also protects the user from the fiberglass, as fiberglass touching bare skin may cause medical issues. A ratcheting system is attached to the top of the outer layer, but goes through the whole splint, to allow the user to tighten the splint to a comfortable pressure.

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Testing and Results

For testing our product we had three of our group members attempt to put on and tighten the splint unassisted. All of the team members were able to accomplish this the majority of the time the only complications arising from misaligned cords and occasional holding issues. The splint preformed exactly as predicted and provided a firm compressive force over the theoretically injured area.

 

 

Team member Number of times splint applied Average Time to apply splint Pressure Usability Holding Successfully applied
Richard Taylor 3 3 min None Cable orientation difficulty none Yes
Davis Julian 2 1 min None Cable orientation difficulty Velcro came loose Yes
Hunter Bradshaw 3 2 min None None Velcro came loose Yes

 

 

The splint failed the usability test and will be fixed by sewing cable guides along the outside of the splint to ensure proper orientation. The Velcro will be switched to a stronger type and reevaluated.

 

This product enables quick self-applicable quality first aid in a compact package. It will enable the buyer to face any adventuring obstacle with confidence.

Video Link:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wSQTygnCzFaTqBaq0nM569qwaefvVRPb

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Meet the Team

 

>Rachel Jenkinson

Rachel is from Sacramento, CA, and is currently in her fifth and final year of her ME undergraduate program. Rachel has been involved with FIRST for 8 years, constructing practice fields, constructed, welded, and worked on pneumatics for robots, and has helped with programming robots for both FIRST Robotics and FIRST Lego League. Currently, after graduation, she plans to work in the robotics field, and expand her welding skills. Outside of school, she has travelled extensively, visiting Italy, Australia, Turkey, Croatia, and plans to visit Germany and Hungary in 2018.

 

 

>Davis Julian

Davis was born and raised in Grass Valley, California and moved to Reno, Nevada in 2006. Davis has had an interest in the engineering field from a young age. As a child he assisted his father with construction, welding, and automotive tasks. During his academic career, Davis has taken particular interest in the areas of machine design and CAD/CAM software. Davis has applied his skills with computer design software outside of the classroom by designing and building multiple structures and machine components for personal projects. Davis’s current plans are to enroll in General Electric’s Edison program and pursue a Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. Outside of school, Davis has travelled internationally for both leisure and volunteering experiences. In his time he has joined multiple volunteering programs on the African continent with a focus on wildlife conservation.

 

 

 

>Richard Taylor

Rick is born and raised in Reno Nevada and has traveled extensively during his college career. Most recently he has returned from a deployment to Africa where he was able to use his troubleshooting and analytical skills learned in his engineering career to exceed in his duties and responsibilities. After graduating Rick plans on pursuing a career in biomedical engineering. That could take the form of graduate school or an entry level job in a biomedical engineering company.

 

 

 

 

>Richard Taylor

Rick is born and raised in Reno Nevada and has traveled extensively during his college career. Most recently he has returned from a deployment to Africa where he was able to use his troubleshooting and analytical skills learned in his engineering career to exceed in his duties and responsibilities. After graduating Rick plans on pursuing a career in biomedical engineering. That could take the form of graduate school or an entry level job in a biomedical engineering company.

 

 

 

 

 

>Daniel Barton

Daniel is a military child, who has traveled the United States and the far east and has volunteer for the troops in various events growing up.  Daniel is Interning at Ormat Technologies; the world’s largest Vertically Integrated company.  He is currently working on Project Safety Management for several power plants in the United States.  After graduation, Daniel wants to travel around Europe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Acknowledgements

Team Minute Care would like to thank the following the people for the outstanding support and a source for advice and encouragement during this project:

 

Paquito Morpe | Plant Engineer | Ormat Technologies

 

Sean Sullivan | Chemical Engineer | Ormat Technologies

 

Shandor Korda | Process Engineer | PCC Structurals, Inc.

 

Kara | Art Lab Assistant | UNR

 

Angel and Christian

 

Crystal Harvey| Valerie Banuelos | Innevation Center

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