2018_Team16

Project Overview  |  Proof of Concept  |  Final Design  |  Fabrication  |  Testing and Results  |  Meet the Team  |  Acknowledgements


Project Overview

The Grease Monkeys are designing an improved system for the lubrication of a 400 x 200-ton ring rolling machine operated by Arconic Fastening Systems and Rings in Verdi, Nevada. The current system has been flagged as a safety hazard by environment, health, and safety. Currently, a helper manually applies grease using a grease brush leaving him or her in close proximity to the heated part and pinch points during the rolling operation. It is up to the team to create this new system which will improve the safety and manufacturing repeatability by reducing the element of human influence. Arconic has requested that this system be controlled remotely by the operator of the 400 x 200-ton ring mill so that he or she has greater control over the functionality of the overall manufacturing system. Due to the environments of their forge, the designed system must be able to withstand an environment with a maximum temperature of 2150° F. Arconic also requires that the machine be adaptable for rings of various sizes. As Arconic manufactures rings of a wide range of sizes and shapes (from 24 inches to 120 inches in diameter), the system must work to lubricate these rings and adjust to hit points that need lubrication. Finally, the project must be compatible with the 55 gallon drum pumping system that Arconic currently has. The completion and delivery of this system is scheduled for late April/early May 2018.

The Grease Monkeys are designing an improved system for the lubrication of a 400 x 200-ton ring rolling machine operated by Arconic Fastening Systems and Rings in Verdi, Nevada. The current system has been flagged as a safety hazard by environment, health, and safety. Currently, a helper manually applies grease using a grease brush leaving him or her in close proximity to the heated part and pinch points during the rolling operation. It is up to the team to create this new system which will improve the safety and manufacturing repeatability by reducing the element of human influence. Arconic has requested that this system be controlled remotely by the operator of the 400 x 200-ton ring mill so that he or she has greater control over the functionality of the overall manufacturing system. Due to the environments of their forge, the designed system must be able to withstand an environment with a maximum temperature of 2150° F. Arconic also requires that the machine be adaptable for rings of various sizes. As Arconic manufactures rings of a wide range of sizes and shapes (from 24 inches to 120 inches in diameter), the system must work to lubricate these rings and adjust to hit points that need lubrication. Finally, the project must be compatible with the 55 gallon drum pumping system that Arconic currently has. The completion and delivery of this system is scheduled for late April/early May 2018.

Grease Monkeys has partnered with the aerospace manufacturing company Arconic to produce a lubrication system for a 400 x 200-ton ring rolling press. Arconic operates primarily in the manufacturing engineering field as a third party supplier of rolled aerospace components, with a limited number of competitors. However, Arconic is also a supplier of aluminum and other raw materials. In this field, Arconic has easily identifiable competitors, including Arconic’s former sister company, Alcoa, and American manufacturing company Reliance Steel and Aluminum. To prepare for this project, Team 16 has done extensive research in the field of manufacturing engineering and on how to improve the manufacturing process. Team 16 met with Arconic’s engineering and manufacturing teams to better understand the company’s expectations. Team 16 has also taken tours of Arconic’s manufacturing facility to better incorporate the automated grease dispenser into the existing ring rolling machine. As Grease Monkeys is an engineering solutions company, the Automated Grease Dispenser is a specific solution to a targeted problem Arconic is having with lubrication of their ring rolling machines. Due to the unique situation, it is unlikely the resulting system will be directly applicable to other customers’ needs in the future.

 

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Proof of Concept

For the proof of concept, it was decided that the main functionalities that needed to be designed are the mechanism interface with ring roller, alignment of nozzle, adjust spray pattern, division of lubricant, and transform into spray pattern.  The options were chosen from the results of the decision matrix. For the mechanism interface with ring roller option that was chosen was a moveable cart. The function of the moveable cart is to move the automated grease machine apparatus around the ring roller in order to enable the automated grease machine to spray lubricant throughout the ring roller. For the alignment of nozzle a flexible hose was chosen. The functionality of a flexible hose is to be able to align the lubricant spray with the ring rollers that are rolling variable length steel. Because of the variable length steel the lubricant spray needs to be able to be adjusted and a flexible hose enables that. For adjustment of spray pattern, the option manually adjust was chosen. The functionality of the option manually adjust enables the automated grease machine to vary the spray pattern of the lubricant flow in order to accommodate the variable sized steel that is being rolled.  For the function division of lubricant it was decided to use a manifold to divide lubricant. By using a manifold it enables the automated grease machine to pump grease into multiple nozzles/hoses in order to be able to spray lubricant at a wide variety of angles simultaneously on the ring roller. For transform into spray pattern the option that was chosen was a nozzle. By using a nozzle to transform into a spray pattern it will increase the internal pressure of the system which is inversely proportional to the force of the spray. By increasing the force of the stray, the nozzle is enabling the automated grease machine to apply lubricant from a longer distance. For this proof of concept Team 16B is trying to prove that an automatic grease machine can be created to lubricate a ring roller that rolls steel with varying heights, lengths, and widths. Our concept has real world application because it was specifically designed for our sponsor to be implement in their ring rolling apparatus.

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Final design

Product Design Specifications

As required by Arconic, the business sponsoring the project, a price limit was set and the final product goals were defined to ensure that the resulting system is a viable option. Specific requirements of the product itself include dimension maximums, compatibility with pre-existing components, and grease application specifics. Product shall be controlled via a wireless remote that is easily understandable and can be operated without certification. The software shall include a program to control the flow of lubricant with an indication of status. Due to the environment of the product, materials in production will all need to maintain structural integrity in the presence of the 2150-degree F rings. Interface requirements include: strictly no obstruction of nearby moving parts, grease drum uptake, integration with existing ring roller machine, and if necessary utilization of available facility resources (air pressure regulator, electrical receptacle). Product shall maintain an initial lifespan of 5 years with bi-annual maintenance, and with servicing last an additional 10 years. All parts are to be easily accessible for replacement using standard hand tools. To ensure safety of the system, a factor of safety on operating pressure for components under pressure is set at 4.0, warning labels will be present on high pressure lines, and all metal components will be grounded. All materials of construction shall meet RoHS requirements, and the system will comply with all State and Federal Regulations.

Project Characteristics

Grease Monkeys’ project is an industrial automatic lubrication system designed for providing lubrication to an industrial ring roller machine. The automatic lubrication systems will automatically lubricate the ring roller. The automatic lubrication system will operate using pneumatic pressure from the buildings pneumatic air system to pressurize the system. The system will pump its’ lubricant from 55-gallon lubricant barrels. The automatic lubrication systems nozzles will be adjustable by using flexible piping and adjustable nozzle heads. The system will utilize ball nozzle heads to increase the area of the spray pattern.  The automatic lubrication system will be remotely controlled by utilizing an Arduino using a RF transmitter/receiver to control the pumps actuators by control of a button.

Project Purpose

The purpose of the project is to provide Arconic with a safer, more efficient system to lubricate their ring rolling machines. Currently, a floor operator with a mop and a bucket of grease must stand near the super-heated rings to manually apply grease as the rings are manufactured. The purpose of the project is to remove that floor operator from harm’s way and lubricate the rings from a safe distance. This is useful for the consumer for several reasons. Primarily, worker health and safety are of paramount concern to Arconic. By removing the need for a floor operator, a health and safety hazard is removed from the workplace. Secondly, by removing the need for a floor operator, the floor operator who would have been applying the grease to the ring rolling machine can be used elsewhere, increasing person-hour efficiency, and saving money. Thirdly, by utilizing an automated system, the grease can be applied more uniformly and conservatively, decreasing material waste and saving the company money in lost product.

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Fabrication

Fabrication and Assembly Plan

The Grease Monkeys will be assembling the grease distribution system out of ½” steel pipe and related fittings (figures 1 and 2, respectively). The piping will run from the grease pump to the distribution nozzles which will be attached to the ring rolling machine.  The nozzles will be ordered from McMaster Carr and will be machined using a horizontal lathe to the specifications per figure 3. All the piping and related fitting will be pipe threaded, and then welded together to ensure the longevity and durability of the product, as well as to ensure there are no leaks in the high-pressure system. The steel piping will then be attached (but not welded, so future adjustments can be made) to the grease pump. The grease pump will then be attached, via high pressure air fittings and hoses (figure 4), to a facility air compressor. The air compressor will have a remote-controlled solenoid attached to the high-pressure air line, which will be controlled by the Arduino and its’ related circuitry (figure 5). The team will install a button to the Arduino to accept user inputs and transfer them via wi-fi to the solenoid.

Operation

The operator of the ring rolling machine will input user commands into the Arduino, which will open and close the solenoid as needed. The opening of the solenoid will open the high-pressure air line, allowing compressed air flow into the grease pump. The grease pump will, in turn, pressurize the grease in the holding tank, and will pressurize the grease in the steel piping lines. The high-pressure grease will then be squirted out of the machined nozzles onto the seamless rings.

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Testing and Results

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Meet the Team

 

Gordon Loyd

Gordon Loyd is a senior mechanical engineering student at the University of Nevada, Reno. He was raised in Sonora, California and moved to Reno in 2014. Gordon has had two internships so far, the first of which being for the Northern California Power Agency’s hydroelectric division. He currently works for Lincoln Electric Cutting Systems, working to improve his knowledge in the manufacturing engineering field. He hopes in the future to work in the automotive industry, making a career out of his hobby of working on cars.

 

 

Austin Boone

Austin Boone has an associates of science degree from TMCC. The most challenging engineering project he has been involved in is making a rube Goldberg machine to which he had to apply analytical techniques in order to design. Boone has developed his analytical and qualitative skills during his academic career. Outside of school and his engineering career he is in the army National Guard. He is from Reno, Nevada. His goals are currently to graduate in the spring and then to secure employment in engineering.

 

 

 

 

Sean Fitzgerald

Sean is currently a senior at the University of Nevada, Reno but is originally from Mililani, Hawaii. He plans to graduate in May 2018. He currently interns at Arconic Fasteners and Rings in Verdi, Nevada and previously spent the summer interning at ClickBond Inc in Carson City. During his recent internship, he has worked on building and designing machines and mechanisms for adhesive injection cartridges and helicoil insertions. Following graduation, Sean hopes to find a job working in the manufacturing industry before returning to school to obtain a master’s degree and returning to work in engineering management.

 

 

 

Brita Gonyou

Brita Gonyou is currently a senior Mechanical Engineering student at the University of Nevada, Reno. She will be graduating in the spring of 2018. Gonyou was born and raised in Reno; once graduated, she hopes to stay in the area and begin her career in the engineering workforce. She flourishes in any hands-on project and is always thirsty for knowledge thus making the ever changing, engineering environment a perfect fit.

 

 

 

 

Gina Phillipsen

Phillipsen, a junior, was raised in the Sierra Nevada Foothills. She plans on obtaining her degree in Mechanical Engineering with a Mathematics minor. Phillipsen was elected the Evening With Industry Coordinator this year on behalf of SWE (The Society of Women Engineers). She enjoys volunteering, and believes engineering will provide her with the tools to help many others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Acknowledgements

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